certificate jewelry, Turquoise

What is Turquoise ?

Turquoise is a matte mineral that is found in beautiful shades of blue, bluish green, green and yellowish green. It has been valued as a precious stone for centuries. The ancient peoples of Africa, Asia, South America, and North America independently used turquoise as a gemstone used for inlays and small sculptures.

In terms of chemical formula, turquoise is a hydrated phosphate of copper and aluminum (CuAl6 (PO4) 4 (OH) 8 · 4H2O). Its only important use is in the manufacture of jewelry and ornaments. However, it is so popular that the English language uses the word "turquoise" as the name for the slightly greenish blue color that is common for high quality turquoise.

Few minerals have a color that is so well known, distinct, and effective that the mineral name is commonly used. Only the other three minerals - gold, silver and copper - have a color that is more commonly used than turquoise in common languages.

Turquoise is the traditional birthday stone of December and the gem of the 11th anniversary. Turquoise is the traditional December birthday stone of interest to famous modern jewelry designers as well as South American and Native American jewelry. No jewelry collection should have at least one piece that represents this December birthday stone.



Turquoise History

Turquoise with striking colors of sky blue to blue-green has been valued around the world for more than 5,000 years. Aluminum phosphate turquoise is a clear, sky-blue or green base that contains copper. It has been valued as a precious stone for centuries. The name "turquoise" is derived from the French "turqueise" meaning "Turkish stone", as it was first transported to Europe through a Turkish nation. The color we know as turquoise was named after this gemstone.

Ancient Egypt and the Aztecs used turquoise as a gemstone and decorative stone. The mask and tomb of King Tutankhamun were decorated in turquoise. The ancient Egyptians believed that blue was a symbol of re-creation, so turquoise was a very valuable decorative and superstitious commodity. Mesoamericans used turquoise mosaics and the Chinese used turquoise as decoration. Native Americans also used turquoise in works of art and jewelry, some of which were believed to have protective properties. Tibetans believe in the healing properties of turquoise and have valued turquoise jewelry for centuries.

For thousands of years, turquoise stones have been admired and carved in a variety of shapes, from thrones and daggers to jewelry and cups. The Egyptians believed that turquoise brought good luck and made them invincible. They carved this stone into symbolic jewelry and sculptures.

The use of turquoise dates back to about 5500 BC, when it was believed to prevent accidents and cure head and heart disease. A legend says that throwing a piece of turquoise into the river causes rain.

Turquoise was a sacred stone to many Native Americans. In medicine, turquoise was used in their treatment. Turquoise, often carved in the shape of animals, was placed in tombs and is believed to protect the dead.

 Turquoise is one of the oldest gems in the world. A careful study of archeology revealed that the rulers of ancient Egypt adorned themselves with turquoise jewelry, which was carved by Chinese artisans more than 3,000 years ago. Turquoise is the national gem of Tibet and has long been considered a stone that promotes health, good luck and protection against evil.

Turquoise was a ceremonial jewel and a medium of exchange for Native American tribes in the American Southwest. They also used it in their jewelry. The Apaches believed that when attached to a turquoise bow or firearm, it would increase the accuracy of the hunter or warrior.

Turquoise is abundant and available in a wide range of sizes. Commonly used for seeds, cabochons, inlays. Although well known to consumers, it has grown in popularity in the major jewelry industry. It is the largest and most permanent market in the American Southwest. Elsewhere, it is popular with customers who are captivated by the mystery and romance of the area as well as its blue skies.



Famous Turquoise

The most famous turquoise is found in the inlay of the burial mask of the Egyptian king Tutankhamen. The British Museum displays a number of Mesoamerican artefacts covered in turquoise mosaics, including a wooden ceremonial shield, a rain god mask and a two-headed snake.

The Smithsonian Institution also has a collection of interesting turquoise works. A wooden bottle, a Navajo bracelet and a Diadem Empress Marie-Louise. This Diadem was given to Queen Marie Louise by Napoleon during her marriage. Originally adorned with emeralds, it was modified for turquoise gemstones in the 1950s by Van Cleef & Arpels, who acquired the Diadem in 1953 and later sold emeralds as separate jewelry.

Maria Magdalena Philomena Juliana Johanna de Tornos y Steinhart, Duchess of Vendome, wore a turquoise diadem to their wedding on May 2, 2009 at Notre Dame Cathedral for their wedding to Prince Jean of Orleans, Dauphin of France, Duke of Vendome.

A gold and turquoise ring once owned by a writer named Jane Austen was purchased in 2013 by American singer Kelly Clarkson. However, the export ban imposed by the British Minister of Culture allowed the Jane Austen Museum to raise enough money to keep the ring in the UK. Ms. Clarkson agreed to resell the ring, which is now housed in the Jane Austen Hampshire Museum.



Turquoise Origin

Turquoise is formed in the form of grape-like masses or knots in the crevices of rocks. Turquoise with the best quality is located in the northeast of Iran, blue turquoise and uniform and precious from this region is called "robin's egg blue", "sky blue" and "Persian blue". Business people now use the term to describe the color turquoise. Turquoise deposits are also found in Afghanistan, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, China, Israel, Mexico, Tanzania, and the United States.

Today, China is the largest producer of this stone. Hubei Province, in central China, is the main source of many quality gemstones that are currently being mined. Until the 1920s, it was the largest producer of turquoise in the United States; today, most turquoise stone production in the United States is from Arizona and Nevada. The Arizona Sleeping Beauty mine, now closed for turquoise mining, has been a prolific producer for more than four decades.



Turquoise Color

Turquoise is the only gemstone that has a color in its name. Turquoise is sometimes mixed with malachite or chrysocla, creating a blue and green spot. US turquoise contains iron, so it is actually a mixture of turquoise and chalcoside. Because it contains iron, it is green in color. Pure blue turquoise is rare and turquoise has mostly brown, dark gray or black streaks that can be low and dense. These veins are either made of host rock or other minerals and turquoise containing the veins are known as "turquoise matrix". The most popular color is turquoise sky blue, followed by blue-green or apple-green. Blue minerals are rare and that is why turquoise attracts the attention of the gemstone market.

After blue, bluish green stones are popular, green and yellowish green materials are less desirable. The exit from a beautiful blue color is due to the small amount of iron that replaces aluminum in the turquoise structure. This iron gives a turquoise green color in proportion to its abundance.

Some turquoises contain components of its host rock (known as the matrix) that appear as black or brown spider webs or patches inside the turquoise sink. Many cuts try to produce stones that destroy the matrix, but sometimes they spread so evenly or finely in the stone that they cannot be avoided. For some people who buy turquoise jewelry, the matrix inside the stone is attractive. But as a general rule, turquoise with a heavy matrix is ​​less desirable.

Some places produce turquoise with a specific color and appearance. For example, the Sleeping Beauty mine is known for its light blue turquoise and no matrix. Many of the Kingman Mine turquoises are light blue with a black matrix spider web. The Morenci mine produces large amounts of dark turquoise containing pyrite in the matrix. Most Bisbee turquoises are light blue with a brown matrix. People who know turquoise well can often associate the stone properly with a particular mine.



Turquoise Clarity

Turquoise is matte, although clear cases are rare. Shows a matte to matte sheen. Most turquoises have dark gray, brown, or black matrices or other minerals. These components can be high or low in turquoise. The most desirable turquoise is pure and free of blood vessels. However, sometimes streaked turquoise has attractive patterns that make it desirable, such as "spider web turquoise" (also called "spider web turquoise matrix") which has beautiful patterns.



Turquoise Cut

Turquoise has so far been mostly cut for pendants, necklaces, bracelets, belts, earrings, brooches, and rings. It may be cut into oval or fancy cabochons because turquoise is softer than other gemstones, cut into ornaments and used for inlaying. Turquoise spherical beads as well as shredded pieces of turquoise and turquoise chips are also widely used for bracelets, earrings and necklaces.



Turquoise Treatment

Turquoise is a porous material, so it is sometimes impregnated with polymers, wax or plastic to enhance the color and make the surface harder. Turquoise color is also enhanced by the use of oil or paraffin. Imitation turquoise is made from dyeing chalcedony or howlite. Turquoise is first pulverized and then glued, and glass, porcelain, and plastic are commonly used to make turquoise gemstones. "Neolite" is an imitation of turquoise with a dark matrix, also known as "Reese turquoise". "Neo Turquoise" is another imitation turquoise with a dark matrix. "Vienna Turquoise" is another imitation turquoise. All reputable Gohar traders must announce any modification or refinement of turquoise gemstones and must inform the buyers of the synthetic materials.

When small pieces of turquoise are made, they are mixed with a polymer and poured into block-shaped pieces, which are generally regenerated and are called composite turquoise. Sometimes finely chopped turquoise also includes some non-turquoise ingredients. The blocks are then cut into small pieces that are used to cut cabochons, beads and other items. Due to the method of construction, this material is often called "turquoise block".

There are various glass, plastic and ceramic materials with a turquoise-like appearance. Many of these can be easily distinguished from turquoise by their hardness, specific gravity, refractive index, or other properties.



Turquoise Value

In terms of value, color uniformity and saturation are the main factors. In general, darker shades and less green in blue give more value to turquoise. The capacity of a turquoise to get good lacquer without stabilization is also an important factor. Of course, consumers who welcome matrix patterns find their beauty very important in determining their value. Spider turquoise, made with a black and white matrix and a pattern similar to a crochet net, is quite popular.

The highest grades of turquoise are used for cabochons, engraving and inlay. Low grades are used as polished or natural and nugget-style beads.

As no set of gemstones would be complete without several representatives of this species.Turquoise is a real gem deal. Even the highest grade materials are moderately priced compared to many other gemstones.



composite turquoise

When small pieces of turquoise are made, they are mixed with a polymer and poured into block-shaped pieces, which are generally regenerated and are called composite turquoise. Sometimes finely chopped turquoise also includes some non-turquoise ingredients. The blocks are then cut into small pieces that are used to cut cabochons, beads and other items. Due to the method of construction, this material is often called "turquoise block".

Sellers who are proud to sell only their natural jewelry often refuse to sell regenerated turquoise. Some gem identification laboratories are reluctant to label the substance "turquoise" and instead label it "a man-made product." At the same time, some sellers are happy to sell these materials and the jewelry made from them because, although they often look attractive, they have a low price.

This is exactly what Dyed Turquoise is all about. Since turquoise is a porous material and easily accepts color. The color is used to change the turquoise color to a more marketable color. Composite turquoise or reconstituted turquoise is the most common dyed material. The paint can be used to paint turquoise or polymer binders. Sometimes black or brown is used to change the color of the matrix material to make it more obvious and uniform. Dyed turquoise is always worth less than untreated turquoise with the same color and quality.



Synthetic Turquoise

Turquoise and artificial turquoise simulators have been produced in Russia and China since the 1970s. Both countries are fruitful producers. This material is used to make cabochons, beads, small sculptures and many other items.

A small amount of artificial turquoise was produced by Gilson in the 1980s, and some of their materials were used to make jewelry. This color was produced in sky blue, sometimes with a gray spider web. It was a ceramic product with a composition similar to natural turquoise.

There are various glass, plastic and ceramic materials with a turquoise-like appearance. Many of these can be easily distinguished from turquoise by their hardness, specific gravity, refractive index, or other properties.



Identifying Turquoise

As mentioned, there are various glass, plastic and ceramic materials with a turquoise-like appearance. Many of these can be easily distinguished from turquoise by their hardness, specific gravity, refractive index, or other properties.

Turquoise can be identified with sky blue, blue-green or apple-green color and waxy to matt luster. In addition, a hardness of 5 to 6 Mohs can distinguish turquoise from similar gemstones such as chrysocla, varicose veins and smithsonite. Its hardness can also help distinguish turquoise from imitation or synthetic materials.



Real or fake turquoise ?

Howlite and magnesite are light gray to white minerals with symptoms that resemble spider webs and are found in many turquoises. They can be painted with turquoise blue and made them look very similar to natural turquoise. These colored stones deceive many people when entering the market and are still confused by unfamiliar buyers as the original turquoise.

Painted stones have severely damaged the original turquoise market. They have been bought by many people with the idea that turquoise is the original and has caused uncertainty in the minds of many jewelry buyers. This will make some people avoid buying turquoise jewelry.

Today, dyed Howlite and magnesite are still used to make mass-produced grains, cabochons, crushed stones, and other turquoise items in the same shape. These are almost everywhere on the market. Our advice is to be careful if you see a turquoise with a very blue and very uniform color.



Turquoise Healing Properties

If turquoise has entered your life in any way, it is a sign that you need its healing power. The properties of turquoise are related to the healing energy of water, the life-giving element that preserves the earth and its roots. This energy of rejuvenation is what enhances the turquoise crystal's unique ability to support goals.

The water-like properties of this stone bring you to a state of relaxation, which can help reduce stress and eliminate negative energies. In this way, you can also use the healing properties of turquoise to protect energy. Using this stone therapy in daily care is one of the best ways to enjoy the therapeutic benefits of relaxation. Meditation with it can help you achieve dream peace.



Turquoise Meaning

The meaning of turquoise is very diverse. Due to the connection of the stone to the throat chakra and the energy of water, as well as the long history of its use for spiritual healing and energy, the ways of connecting with the meaning of turquoise are endless. However, the most powerful purposes of using turquoise come from its calming and healing energy.

Turquoise is also a very programmable stone, meaning that it can hold any specific therapeutic goal you give it. This makes working with Turquoise even more powerful because it can strengthen and enhance your goals. Put this great master in your spiritual toolbox and let him support all aspects of your life.



Turquoise impact on health

Turquoise recovery frequencies connect you to earth energy. Because Mother Nature is in a state of constant renewal, this stone allows you to accept this regenerative energy and direct it to your recovery. The blue colors of this stone specifically inhibit the energy of water, it has a life-giving element that gives you vitality and youth. You can direct these different energies through turquoise to support your health goals.

Because the healing properties of turquoise are highly programmable, you can plan your stone for any purpose you work with and it can serve as a personal health educator, nutritionist, life coach or any other support guide. To act. Turquoise means more than physical health and can even support your mental health, so it does not matter what you work on.

The water-like properties of this stone bring you to a state of relaxation, which can help reduce stress and eliminate negative energies. In this way, you can also use the healing properties of turquoise to protect energy. Using this stone therapy in daily care is one of the best ways to enjoy the therapeutic benefits of relaxation. Meditation with it can help you achieve dream peace.

Turquoise healing is associated with personal protection, making it a popular shield for ancient warriors on the battlefield. The bright and dazzling color of turquoise has been discovered in Aztec ceremonial masks and war equipment, a tribe that respects this decorative stone for its ability to personally protect against negative forces. In the case of the ancients, it served as a protector against aggressors and other challenges of antiquity. But the protective energy of turquoise crystal stone is not just an ancient myth or story because it is just as powerful and effective today.

Turquoise cleanses your mind, body and soul of any unwanted or negative energy. When you combine this cleansing effect with the gentle energy of the stone, the result is a very uplifting and positive energy. This is why turquoise not only eliminates negative energy, but also replaces positive energy.



Turquoise in jewelry

Turquoise is popular in tribal and ethnic jewelry, especially in Native American and Tibetan styles with silver. However, when placed in a precious metal, yellow gold is just as dazzling as Egyptian-inspired jewelry. Large turquoise gemstones create bold designs while turquoise chips and small beads lend themselves well to more subtle designs. The cool color of turquoise makes it a great summer gemstone and turquoise jewelry can be customized to any type, from simple beads to intricate antique designs. Cartier accent a turquoise cabochon cocktail ring with diamonds set in yellow gold. Bvlgari uses turquoise inlay, colored gemstones and diamonds in yellow gold. Turquoise is used in men's jewelry such as rings and cufflinks, as well as in the decoration of men's accessories such as leather belts.

Note: Buy colored gemstones in terms of size and not in terms of carat weight. Colored stones vary in size and weight. In comparison, some stones are larger and some diamonds are smaller in weight.



Turquoise as a gift

Turquoise is the traditional birthday stone of December and the gem of the 11th anniversary. Turquoise is the traditional December birthday stone of interest to famous modern jewelry designers as well as South American and Native American jewelry. No jewelry collection should have at least one piece that represents this December birthday stone. Turquoise is also the stone born on Saturday.

 

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